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PetsAnimals and Natural DisastersIn a disaster, both domestic and wild animals may have been forced from their natural habitats, leaving them disoriented and possibly aggressive. Be smart and be safe, and follow these tips.Choosing and Using a Pet Crate for TravelCrates and carriers are necessities for pet travel and are required when for pets traveling by air. Keep your pet safe and sound by following these tips for purchasing and using a pet crate.Create a Pet Emergency KitBe ready for an emergency by assembling your pet's must-haves now.Create a Pet Travel KitBe ready to hit the road with your pet by assembling these pet travel items.Farm Animals and Natural DisastersFarm animals often suffer injury during a disaster but are just as likely to receive fresh injury after the storm, if not handled properly. Here are some of the things that can be done in the immediate aftermath of the storm or flood.If You Find a Lost PetIf you've found a lost pet, here's what to do.Managing Your Pet's Separation AnxietyDogs and cats are creatures of habit; they love schedules, routines and their owners. When routines change — school starts, you're away on vacation — your pet may have a tough time handling the situation.Adopting a PetThere are many different types of pets for many different people. Below is a "starter" list to help you select a pet for you and your family.Choosing a Kennel or Pet Daycare FacilityWhether it's for a social hour at doggy daycare or an extended kennel stay while you're away, you want to know your Fluffy or Fido is safe and happy when boarded.Choosing a Pet GroomerGrooming services can include a hair cut, trimming or shaving, combing, brushing, bathing, clipping nails, ear cleaning and teeth cleaning.Protect Your PetSafety first when it comes to your pets. They need you to look out for them!Choosing a Pet TrainerWhether it's puppy kindergarten or show dog or cat training, a great trainer can make a world of difference. But not every trainer can be a "dog whisperer" either!Choosing a VetThe best time to choose a vet is before you actually need one. Even better, meet with a vet before getting a new pet – they can recommend certain animals or even breeds that might best match your lifestyle.Traveling by Air with PetsMore than 2 million pets and animals are transported by air each year in the United States, according to the Department of Transportation. Make it a happy trip for your pet by following these tips.Finding Pet-Friendly HotelsChoosing a hotel can be a challenging task, but it can be even more difficult if you're bringing your pet along.Help My Pet's MissingIf your pet disappears, here's what to do.Traveling by Car with PetsRoad trip! It's great to bring the whole family on a trip, even your pets. To make your next road trip a breeze, read through these top tips from pet experts, vets and pet owners. Happy Trails!Pets and Disaster PreparednessBecause they are a part of the family, too, follow these tips to prepare your pets for a disaster and know what to do should a pet go missing.
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Create a Pet Travel Kit

Be ready to hit the road with your pet by assembling these pet travel items.

WHN Tip: Keep all your pet's travel items together in a large bag or bin – something that can be carried easily.

Food and Water

Enough food for your trip

WHN Expert Tip: Individual-Size Portions
"I like to take out and measure each meal of food for the dog and put each meal in a small, resealable plastic bag. I know if I just grab one of those bags it's the right amount of food and I don't have to bring a measuring cup." Dr. Stephen Zawistowski, ASPCA Executive Vice President of National Programs and Science Advisor and owner of a dog, two cats and some fish

Bottled water or water from yourhome tap, at least 7 days' worth for each pet (may not be allowed if flying)

WHN Expert Tip: BYO H2O
"
A change in the water might cause diarrhea and intestinal distress for the pet. If you're going to a different area, use bottled water. Also, your vet may be able to prescribe an anti-diarrheal medication or suggest a brand of canned food for your pet to prevent loose stools." Lisa Peterson, AKC Director of Club Communications and owner, breeder and handler of Norwegian Elkhounds

Can opener

Pet feeding dishes

Treats

Medical Supplies

14-day supply of medications (in waterproof container)

Anti-diarrhea medication

Antiseptic cream/cleaner

WHN Tip: Ask your vet about the best medications and items for your pet.

Bandages, gauze strips, cotton balls

Hydrogen peroxide for cleaning wounds

Scissors

Tweezers

WHN Expert Tip: Sedatives and Tranquilizers
"
Dogs' inner ears are much more sensitive than a human's, making them more prone to motion sickness. A sedative pill, prescribed by your veterinarian, can help to not only relax your dog but also lessen motion sickness." Dr. Tod Schadler, associate dean of clinical studies at Ross Univ. School of Vet. Medicine

Misc. Items

A traveling bag, crate, cage or sturdy carrier (Label with pet's name, your name, address and contact number.)

WHN Tip: Read our Choosing and Using a Pet Crate for Travel article for tips on finding the right crate or carrier for your needs.

WHN Expert Tip: Plastic Shipping Sleeves
For photocopies of health documentation, we use plastic shipping sleeves (normally used for address labels) to secure the documentation to the top of the travel crate. These sleeves are great as they show the content, stick to the crate easily and usually have a resealable closure - perfect for airport officials to quickly and easily access the documentation." Rachel Farris, PetRelocation.com

Blanket (for comfort or covering cages) and towels

Scooper, newspaper, paper towel, moist towelettes and plastic garbage bags

Disposable litter trays (aluminum roasting pans are perfect) and litter

WHN Expert Tip: Disposable Litter Pans
"I suggest that you use some kind of plastic containers with lids that are about the same size as a litter box. That way you can keep the litter in the box and it's easier to clean." Dr. Stephen Zawistowski, ASPCA Executive Vice President of National Programs and Science Advisor and owner of a dog, two cats and some fish

Extra collar, harness and leash (make sure they fit properly and are labeled with pet's name, your name and contact information)

Flashlight

Grooming/hygiene items (brush, shampoo, nail clippers, etc.)

Liquid dish soap and disinfectant

Toys

Old sheets to cover bedding, the floor, and furniture at your destination

WHN Expert Tip: Exercise Pens
"
I like to pack collapsible pens that are at least about 36 inches high. They're not escape-proof but at least it's something to set up when we stop at rest areas and let the dogs exercise." Matt Stelter, Drs. Foster & Smith representative and professional collie owner and handler

Important Documents

WHN Tip: Keep these documents in a waterproof bag (such as a zippered food bag) or folder.

Photocopies of medical and vaccination records

Copies of prescriptions and instructions for medications

Photocopies of pet insurance cards and policies

Photocopies and details of ID tags, tattoos, microchips and licenses

Recent photos of your pets (in case you are separated and need to make "Lost" posters)

WHN Expert Tip: Make a Cell Phone Tag
"
Have a little tag made that has your cell phone number on it (many pet stores have machines that do this). Stick that on your dog's collar when your traveling. If your dog gets away from you while you're traveling, they'll call you at home but you won't be there!" Dr. Stephen Zawistowski, ASPCA Executive Vice President of National Programs and Science Advisor and owner of a dog, two cats and some fish

A written description of your pet:

  • Pet's name
  • Breed
  • Sex
  • Age
  • Coat, color and markings (scars, spots, etc.)
  • Height
  • Weight
  • Microchip or tattoo numbers
  • Color of collar/leash/tags
  • Any other important details

List of important phone numbers:

WHN Expert Tip: Emergency Contact Information
"I like to keep an emergency ID info card in my car with me. It includes a calling number so in case I'm unconscious they can call someone I know to come and get the pet instead of taking the pet to a shelter or animal control." Lisa Peterson, AKC Director of Club Communications and owner, breeder and handler of Norwegian Elkhounds

Want more travel tips? Top pet travel articles:

Traveling by Car with Pets

Traveling by Air with Pets

Finding Pet-Friendly Hotels

Other Life Pages
PetsAdopting a Pet

There are many different types of pets for many different people. Below is a "starter" list to help you select a pet for you and your family.

 Read More
Animals and Natural Disasters

In a disaster, both domestic and wild animals may have been forced from their natural habitats, leaving them disoriented and possibly aggressive. Be smart and be safe, and follow these tips.

 Read More
Choosing a Kennel or Pet Daycare Facility

Whether it's for a social hour at doggy daycare or an extended kennel stay while you're away, you want to know your Fluffy or Fido is safe and happy when boarded.

 Read More
Choosing a Pet Groomer

Grooming services can include a hair cut, trimming or shaving, combing, brushing, bathing, clipping nails, ear cleaning and teeth cleaning.

 Read More
Choosing a Pet Trainer

Whether it's puppy kindergarten or show dog or cat training, a great trainer can make a world of difference. But not every trainer can be a "dog whisperer" either!

 Read More
Choosing a Vet

The best time to choose a vet is before you actually need one. Even better, meet with a vet before getting a new pet – they can recommend certain animals or even breeds that might best match your lifestyle.

 Read More
Choosing and Using a Pet Crate for Travel

Crates and carriers are necessities for pet travel and are required when for pets traveling by air. Keep your pet safe and sound by following these tips for purchasing and using a pet crate.

 Read More
Create a Pet Emergency Kit

Be ready for an emergency by assembling your pet's must-haves now.

 Read More
Create a Pet Travel Kit

Be ready to hit the road with your pet by assembling these pet travel items.

 Read More
Farm Animals and Natural Disasters

Farm animals often suffer injury during a disaster but are just as likely to receive fresh injury after the storm, if not handled properly. Here are some of the things that can be done in the immediate aftermath of the storm or flood.

 Read More
Finding Pet-Friendly Hotels

Choosing a hotel can be a challenging task, but it can be even more difficult if you're bringing your pet along.

 Read More
Help My Pet's Missing

If your pet disappears, here's what to do.

 Read More
If You Find a Lost Pet

If you've found a lost pet, here's what to do.

 Read More
Managing Your Pet's Separation Anxiety

Dogs and cats are creatures of habit; they love schedules, routines and their owners. When routines change — school starts, you're away on vacation — your pet may have a tough time handling the situation.

 Read More
Pets and Disaster Preparedness

Because they are a part of the family, too, follow these tips to prepare your pets for a disaster and know what to do should a pet go missing.

 Read More
Protect Your Pet

Safety first when it comes to your pets. They need you to look out for them!

 Read More
Traveling by Air with Pets

More than 2 million pets and animals are transported by air each year in the United States, according to the Department of Transportation. Make it a happy trip for your pet by following these tips.

 Read More
Traveling by Car with Pets

Road trip! It's great to bring the whole family on a trip, even your pets. To make your next road trip a breeze, read through these top tips from pet experts, vets and pet owners. Happy Trails!

 Read More