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PetsAnimals and Natural DisastersIn a disaster, both domestic and wild animals may have been forced from their natural habitats, leaving them disoriented and possibly aggressive. Be smart and be safe, and follow these tips.Choosing and Using a Pet Crate for TravelCrates and carriers are necessities for pet travel and are required when for pets traveling by air. Keep your pet safe and sound by following these tips for purchasing and using a pet crate.Create a Pet Emergency KitBe ready for an emergency by assembling your pet's must-haves now.Create a Pet Travel KitBe ready to hit the road with your pet by assembling these pet travel items.Farm Animals and Natural DisastersFarm animals often suffer injury during a disaster but are just as likely to receive fresh injury after the storm, if not handled properly. Here are some of the things that can be done in the immediate aftermath of the storm or flood.If You Find a Lost PetIf you've found a lost pet, here's what to do.Managing Your Pet's Separation AnxietyDogs and cats are creatures of habit; they love schedules, routines and their owners. When routines change — school starts, you're away on vacation — your pet may have a tough time handling the situation.Adopting a PetThere are many different types of pets for many different people. Below is a "starter" list to help you select a pet for you and your family.Choosing a Kennel or Pet Daycare FacilityWhether it's for a social hour at doggy daycare or an extended kennel stay while you're away, you want to know your Fluffy or Fido is safe and happy when boarded.Choosing a Pet GroomerGrooming services can include a hair cut, trimming or shaving, combing, brushing, bathing, clipping nails, ear cleaning and teeth cleaning.Protect Your PetSafety first when it comes to your pets. They need you to look out for them!Choosing a Pet TrainerWhether it's puppy kindergarten or show dog or cat training, a great trainer can make a world of difference. But not every trainer can be a "dog whisperer" either!Choosing a VetThe best time to choose a vet is before you actually need one. Even better, meet with a vet before getting a new pet – they can recommend certain animals or even breeds that might best match your lifestyle.Traveling by Air with PetsMore than 2 million pets and animals are transported by air each year in the United States, according to the Department of Transportation. Make it a happy trip for your pet by following these tips.Finding Pet-Friendly HotelsChoosing a hotel can be a challenging task, but it can be even more difficult if you're bringing your pet along.Help My Pet's MissingIf your pet disappears, here's what to do.Traveling by Car with PetsRoad trip! It's great to bring the whole family on a trip, even your pets. To make your next road trip a breeze, read through these top tips from pet experts, vets and pet owners. Happy Trails!Pets and Disaster PreparednessBecause they are a part of the family, too, follow these tips to prepare your pets for a disaster and know what to do should a pet go missing.
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Help! My Pet's Missing!

If your pet disappears, here's what to do.

Immediately

Check the house. Look in, around and outside your home or the area where you last saw your pet. Rattle favorite toys and treats and call for your pet.

WHN Expert Tip: Look Immediately!
"
Don't wait and assume it'll return home on its own. Be sure to look in a 2-block radius because the cat or dog could be scared or hiding." Barbara Baugnon, Oregon Humane Society

Let people know your pet is missing. Tell them when you last saw your pet and what your pet looks like. Ask neighbors, service providers (letter carriers, garbage collectors, etc.) or passers-by if they've seen your pet.

Place strong home-scented items outside in your yard such as recently worn clothing, the pet's bedding, the cat's litter box, cooked meat, treats, etc. Animals find their way by scent.

If your pet is a rescue pet, call that organization. Many times, they put out calls to fellow "rescuers'" in your neighborhood who will immediately begin looking for your pet.

Next Steps

Make a descriptive list of your pet's features (these will be important to know when trying to locate your pet):

  • Name
  • Breed
  • Weight, size
  • Color of fur and eyes
  • Male or female (also, neutered or spayed)
  • Age
  • Type and color of collar
  • Marks, scars, spots
  • Tag, tattoo and microchip I.D. numbers
  • Medical problems

Make copies of your pet's most recent photo to give to shelters and local authorities. You can also scan the photo to add to "Lost Pet" poster.

Make Daily Calls

Contact local animal control services to see if they've found your pet and where they may have taken him or her.

Contact your local and state animal shelters. Consider visiting the shelters to see if your pets have been found. Provide a picture of your pet and contact number at each shelter.

Call local animal rescue organizations in your area each day. If your pet is a purebred, contact the breed-specific rescue groups.

Call veterinary offices during the day and call emergency animal hospitals at night.

If your pet has a microchip implant, notify the company.

If you believe your pet was stolen, contact the police or sheriff to file a police report.

Contact the local and state department of transportation in case your pet was hit by a car.

WHN Expert Tip: Smaller Communities
"Live in a smaller community? Consider putting an ad on the local radio stations about your missing pet." Leslie Rocky – Colorado Animal Rescue Center, Glenwood Springs CO

Publicize It

Make "Lost" signs or flyers, using bright colors and big lettering to attract attention, with the the pet's name, photo, descriptive markings or scars and your contact number. Hang these in the area where your pet was last seen, high enough for drivers to see.

Consider offering a reward.

WHN Expert Tip: Stay Close
"
When putting up flyers aim for at least a 3-block radius of your home – pets tend to stay closer to home." Karen Sands – Humane Society of Greater Kansas City, KS

Put a "Lost" ad in your local newspaper and publications as well.

WHN Tip: Don't put your home address or last name on the flyer or in the ad. That might attract the wrong type of attention. Instead use your first name and cell number.

Check the "Found" ads in local newspapers, publications and online.

Celebrate Its Return

Check it over immediately for any injuries.

If your pet has injuries or appears to be sick, be very careful handling it. Even if it knows you, your pet may bite and scratch you, due to fear and pain.

Use a blanket to cover and wrap the animal before you try to move it. This will help prevent injury to you and the animal.

Take it to a veterinarian as soon as possible.

Notify the agencies you've been calling that your pet is back home.

Take down all the flyers you posted.

WHN Tip: "I've Found Your Pet"
If you do not know the person, meet in a public place such as a church or store parking lot during the day. Bring someone with you to pick up your pet. If you offered a reward, consider bringing that with you when you pick up your pet.

If A Shelter Or Animal Control Center Finds Your Pet

Ask when and where to pick up your pet

Ask if there are any fines or fees for boarding while the pet was there.

WHN Tip: If your pet is found and the tags or vaccinations aren't up to date, you could be charged a fine.

Don't delay. Shelters and other facilities might only keep the animal for a limited time. After that, the pet may be put up for adoption, given to another organization or euthanized.

WHN Expert Tip: "If the shelter has spayed or neutered your pet or installed a microchip, you will probably have to pay for those services." Barbara Baugnon, Oregon Humane Society

WHN Tip: If your pet tends to "slip its collar" leaving it behind on the chain, add a second one with all the ID information.

Other Life Pages
PetsAdopting a Pet

There are many different types of pets for many different people. Below is a "starter" list to help you select a pet for you and your family.

 Read More
Animals and Natural Disasters

In a disaster, both domestic and wild animals may have been forced from their natural habitats, leaving them disoriented and possibly aggressive. Be smart and be safe, and follow these tips.

 Read More
Choosing a Kennel or Pet Daycare Facility

Whether it's for a social hour at doggy daycare or an extended kennel stay while you're away, you want to know your Fluffy or Fido is safe and happy when boarded.

 Read More
Choosing a Pet Groomer

Grooming services can include a hair cut, trimming or shaving, combing, brushing, bathing, clipping nails, ear cleaning and teeth cleaning.

 Read More
Choosing a Pet Trainer

Whether it's puppy kindergarten or show dog or cat training, a great trainer can make a world of difference. But not every trainer can be a "dog whisperer" either!

 Read More
Choosing a Vet

The best time to choose a vet is before you actually need one. Even better, meet with a vet before getting a new pet – they can recommend certain animals or even breeds that might best match your lifestyle.

 Read More
Choosing and Using a Pet Crate for Travel

Crates and carriers are necessities for pet travel and are required when for pets traveling by air. Keep your pet safe and sound by following these tips for purchasing and using a pet crate.

 Read More
Create a Pet Emergency Kit

Be ready for an emergency by assembling your pet's must-haves now.

 Read More
Create a Pet Travel Kit

Be ready to hit the road with your pet by assembling these pet travel items.

 Read More
Farm Animals and Natural Disasters

Farm animals often suffer injury during a disaster but are just as likely to receive fresh injury after the storm, if not handled properly. Here are some of the things that can be done in the immediate aftermath of the storm or flood.

 Read More
Finding Pet-Friendly Hotels

Choosing a hotel can be a challenging task, but it can be even more difficult if you're bringing your pet along.

 Read More
Help My Pet's Missing

If your pet disappears, here's what to do.

 Read More
If You Find a Lost Pet

If you've found a lost pet, here's what to do.

 Read More
Managing Your Pet's Separation Anxiety

Dogs and cats are creatures of habit; they love schedules, routines and their owners. When routines change — school starts, you're away on vacation — your pet may have a tough time handling the situation.

 Read More
Pets and Disaster Preparedness

Because they are a part of the family, too, follow these tips to prepare your pets for a disaster and know what to do should a pet go missing.

 Read More
Protect Your Pet

Safety first when it comes to your pets. They need you to look out for them!

 Read More
Traveling by Air with Pets

More than 2 million pets and animals are transported by air each year in the United States, according to the Department of Transportation. Make it a happy trip for your pet by following these tips.

 Read More
Traveling by Car with Pets

Road trip! It's great to bring the whole family on a trip, even your pets. To make your next road trip a breeze, read through these top tips from pet experts, vets and pet owners. Happy Trails!

 Read More