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PetsAnimals and Natural DisastersIn a disaster, both domestic and wild animals may have been forced from their natural habitats, leaving them disoriented and possibly aggressive. Be smart and be safe, and follow these tips.Choosing and Using a Pet Crate for TravelCrates and carriers are necessities for pet travel and are required when for pets traveling by air. Keep your pet safe and sound by following these tips for purchasing and using a pet crate.Create a Pet Emergency KitBe ready for an emergency by assembling your pet's must-haves now.Create a Pet Travel KitBe ready to hit the road with your pet by assembling these pet travel items.Farm Animals and Natural DisastersFarm animals often suffer injury during a disaster but are just as likely to receive fresh injury after the storm, if not handled properly. Here are some of the things that can be done in the immediate aftermath of the storm or flood.If You Find a Lost PetIf you've found a lost pet, here's what to do.Managing Your Pet's Separation AnxietyDogs and cats are creatures of habit; they love schedules, routines and their owners. When routines change — school starts, you're away on vacation — your pet may have a tough time handling the situation.Adopting a PetThere are many different types of pets for many different people. Below is a "starter" list to help you select a pet for you and your family.Choosing a Kennel or Pet Daycare FacilityWhether it's for a social hour at doggy daycare or an extended kennel stay while you're away, you want to know your Fluffy or Fido is safe and happy when boarded.Choosing a Pet GroomerGrooming services can include a hair cut, trimming or shaving, combing, brushing, bathing, clipping nails, ear cleaning and teeth cleaning.Protect Your PetSafety first when it comes to your pets. They need you to look out for them!Choosing a Pet TrainerWhether it's puppy kindergarten or show dog or cat training, a great trainer can make a world of difference. But not every trainer can be a "dog whisperer" either!Choosing a VetThe best time to choose a vet is before you actually need one. Even better, meet with a vet before getting a new pet – they can recommend certain animals or even breeds that might best match your lifestyle.Traveling by Air with PetsMore than 2 million pets and animals are transported by air each year in the United States, according to the Department of Transportation. Make it a happy trip for your pet by following these tips.Finding Pet-Friendly HotelsChoosing a hotel can be a challenging task, but it can be even more difficult if you're bringing your pet along.Help My Pet's MissingIf your pet disappears, here's what to do.Traveling by Car with PetsRoad trip! It's great to bring the whole family on a trip, even your pets. To make your next road trip a breeze, read through these top tips from pet experts, vets and pet owners. Happy Trails!Pets and Disaster PreparednessBecause they are a part of the family, too, follow these tips to prepare your pets for a disaster and know what to do should a pet go missing.
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Protect Your Pet

Safety first when it comes to your pets. They need you to look out for them!

Secure Your Pet

Register your pet. Many cities require licenses for certain animals. Complete the forms, which may also entail a fee, at your local city hall or other location.

Tag your pet. On the pet's collar put the license tag, rabies tag, and tag with your name, address and home/work/cell numbers. (Update the information if you move.)

WHN Tip: Consider getting your pet micro-chipped — a tiny chip with the owner's contact information that's placed under the pet's skin. The information is kept in a national database, making it easier to reunite pets and owners.

Make a pet emergency and first aid kit. (Click here for first aid tips for dogs or here for first aid information for dogs and cats.)

Leash your pet. Letting them run free can be dangerous, and, in some communities, against the law.

Pet-Proof Your Home

Remove temptation. Put any chemicals and food that may be poisonous to your pet out of reach. Use childproof latches to keep little paws from prying open cabinets.

Chemicals and Household Items

  • Antifreeze (very dangerous!)
  • Batteries
  • Cleaning supplies
  • De-icing salts and products
  • Fabric softener sheets
  • Fumes from nonstick cooking pans and self-cleaning ovens (harmful to birds)
  • Lawn chemicals
  • Mothballs
  • Painting supplies
  • Pest and rodent traps
  • Pine needles and Christmas tree water (contains bacteria and fertilizers)
  • Plastic wrappers and bags
  • Small toys
  • String, yarn, rubber bands

    WHN Tip: Know what plants pose a danger. Review the ASPCA's list of Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants.

    WHN Tip: Read product labels carefully before using them on your pet. Certain products may be harmful for specific animals.

    Health and Food Items

    • Alcoholic beverages
    • Avocados (toxic to birds, mice, rabbits)
    • Caffeine (tea, soda, etc.)
    • Chicken bones (cause choking)
    • Chocolate (poisonous to cats, dogs and ferrets)
    • Coffee
    • Fruit pits and seeds
    • Garlic
    • Macadamia nuts
    • Medications
    • Moldy foods
    • Onions
    • Salt
    • Vitamins
    • Yeast

    General Safety Tips

    Keep all sharp objects and tools out of reach

    Keep lit candles out of reach

    Keep all electric cords out of reach or covered by a chew-proof guard.

    Keep trash cans covered or inside a latched cabinet

    Keep foods out of reach (even if the food isn't harmful, the wrapper could be)

    Keep the toilet lid closed to prevent drowning or drinking of harmful cleaning chemicals

    Keep laundry and shoes behind closed doors (drawstrings and buttons can cause major problems if swallowed)

    Identify small spaces where your pet could hide or become trapped.

    Use baby gates to keep pets in or out of specific areas.

    Make sure all fences, gates and pet doors are sturdy and can be locked. Fix any holes or wires that might be poking out.

    Cover your outside pool or pond. Many heavily-coated dogs and cats may be unable to swim to safety when their coats are soaking wet.

    Keep pets away from ice-covered ponds and lakes. Cats and dogs may wander onto ice too thin to support their weight.

    Always check to see where your pet is before you move your car.

    WHN Tip: Make sure your animals have plenty of chew toys or scratching posts so they don't start to chew or scratch your possessions!

    What To Do In Case of Poisoning

    Warning signs:

    • Listlessness
    • Abdominal pain
    • Vomiting and/or diarrhea
    • Muscle tremors
    • Lack of coordination
    • Fever.

    If you suspect your pet has ingested a poison, call your vet or the Animal Poison Control Center Hotline (888-426-4435). (Note: There is a $65 charge for this service.)

    Provide:

    • The name and amount of the poison your animal was exposed to
    • When it happened
    • Your pet's species, breed, age, sex, and weight
    • The symptoms the animal is displaying
    • Your name, address, phone number

    WHN TIP: Do not induce vomiting unless told to do so. However, keep a bottle of ipecac or hydrogen peroxide safely locked away, just in case.

    Other Life Pages
    PetsAdopting a Pet

    There are many different types of pets for many different people. Below is a "starter" list to help you select a pet for you and your family.

     Read More
    Animals and Natural Disasters

    In a disaster, both domestic and wild animals may have been forced from their natural habitats, leaving them disoriented and possibly aggressive. Be smart and be safe, and follow these tips.

     Read More
    Choosing a Kennel or Pet Daycare Facility

    Whether it's for a social hour at doggy daycare or an extended kennel stay while you're away, you want to know your Fluffy or Fido is safe and happy when boarded.

     Read More
    Choosing a Pet Groomer

    Grooming services can include a hair cut, trimming or shaving, combing, brushing, bathing, clipping nails, ear cleaning and teeth cleaning.

     Read More
    Choosing a Pet Trainer

    Whether it's puppy kindergarten or show dog or cat training, a great trainer can make a world of difference. But not every trainer can be a "dog whisperer" either!

     Read More
    Choosing a Vet

    The best time to choose a vet is before you actually need one. Even better, meet with a vet before getting a new pet – they can recommend certain animals or even breeds that might best match your lifestyle.

     Read More
    Choosing and Using a Pet Crate for Travel

    Crates and carriers are necessities for pet travel and are required when for pets traveling by air. Keep your pet safe and sound by following these tips for purchasing and using a pet crate.

     Read More
    Create a Pet Emergency Kit

    Be ready for an emergency by assembling your pet's must-haves now.

     Read More
    Create a Pet Travel Kit

    Be ready to hit the road with your pet by assembling these pet travel items.

     Read More
    Farm Animals and Natural Disasters

    Farm animals often suffer injury during a disaster but are just as likely to receive fresh injury after the storm, if not handled properly. Here are some of the things that can be done in the immediate aftermath of the storm or flood.

     Read More
    Finding Pet-Friendly Hotels

    Choosing a hotel can be a challenging task, but it can be even more difficult if you're bringing your pet along.

     Read More
    Help My Pet's Missing

    If your pet disappears, here's what to do.

     Read More
    If You Find a Lost Pet

    If you've found a lost pet, here's what to do.

     Read More
    Managing Your Pet's Separation Anxiety

    Dogs and cats are creatures of habit; they love schedules, routines and their owners. When routines change — school starts, you're away on vacation — your pet may have a tough time handling the situation.

     Read More
    Pets and Disaster Preparedness

    Because they are a part of the family, too, follow these tips to prepare your pets for a disaster and know what to do should a pet go missing.

     Read More
    Protect Your Pet

    Safety first when it comes to your pets. They need you to look out for them!

     Read More
    Traveling by Air with Pets

    More than 2 million pets and animals are transported by air each year in the United States, according to the Department of Transportation. Make it a happy trip for your pet by following these tips.

     Read More
    Traveling by Car with Pets

    Road trip! It's great to bring the whole family on a trip, even your pets. To make your next road trip a breeze, read through these top tips from pet experts, vets and pet owners. Happy Trails!

     Read More