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Senior LivingSenior Living ServicesIf your aging family member needs assistance, here is information on senior living environments and services. Seniors Living Safely and IndependentlyTravel writer and author Doris Larson and her husband Gerald like their independence and freedom. So with an eye toward making their senior years as enjoyable as possible, the couple from Kent, Ohio are investigating their options. Finding a Geriatric CaregiverIf the time has come for you to find a caregiver for your aging relative, Shelly Sun, founder and CEO of BrightStar Healthcare (a national caregiving franchise) has the following recommendations.Choosing an Adult Day ServiceOver 10 million Americans are part of the "sandwich generation" – busy, working adults trying to care for their aging parents while also raising their own children.Long-Distance Caregiving TipsIf you're caring for a loved one from a distance, you're not alone. Approximately 7 million adults are long-distance caregivers, mostly caring for aging parents who live an hour or more away. Here are some quick tips to get you started.Seniors and Disaster PreparednessSenior citizens are particularly vulnerable during emergency situations – hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, even heat waves. Sixty (60) percent of people who died in Louisiana as a result of Hurricane Katrina were older than 60.
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Long-Distance Caregiving Tips

If you're caring for a loved one from a distance, you're not alone.

Approximately 7 million adults are long-distance caregivers, mostly caring for aging parents who live an hour or more away. Here are some quick tips to get you started.

Talk About Care Before You Need It

Start the caregiving process with a relative or friend before something comes up or a situation arises. Ask a few questions to get the conversation started:

How do you envision your care to be?

What type of care would you like to receive?

Is your personal business 'caught up' or in order? Like advance directives, health care and financial power of attorney, wills and so on?

Stay In Touch

Keep a regular schedule to check in with your loved one and monitor their progress.

Get help from people in the community, a next door neighbor, an old friend, the doctor, etc. Call and let them know what is going on and make sure they know how to reach you.

At some point you will need to visit, so investigate travel options well in advance.

Keep your car well-maintained and have a valid driver's license, auto insurance and/or a valid passport (if you need to travel internationally).

If something has changed in your loved one's manner or health, consider contacting a third party (i.e. doctor, social worker, geriatric care manager) to set up an assessment. The assessment helps generate a general plan for long-term care. The plan might be updated or modified to fit your loved one's needs.

When a plan is established, schedule regular conference calls with health and general care providers.

WHN Tip: Curious about different types of care and living options? Visit our Senior Living Services and What is Hospice? sections about selecting a care facility.

Keep Detailed Records

Start a long-distance caregiving binder, folder, notebook to track important documents, conversations, info on health conditions, medications, advance directives, insurance bills and receipts, etc.

Find Resources

Establish a network of contacts in your area and your relative's. These can include the local department on aging in your relative's community, volunteer programs, adult day care centers, doctors, pharmacists, neighbors, care providers, social workers and geriatric care managers.

WHN Tip: Contact local resources in your area (social workers, geriatric care managers, doctors, home health aides, etc.) for help in navigating the system in your relative's area. They may offer consultations on long-distance caregiving or know helpful contacts in that location.

Once you've found your main contacts, keep their complete contact information at home and at work, and also in your cell phone in case of emergency.

Caregiving Is Like a Second Job

Ask for help

Establish a caregiving team to help you: friends and family members as well as important professionals (social workers, geriatric care managers, doctors and so on).

Remember to take care of yourself and your needs.

Additional Resources

Eldercare Locator
Eldercare Locator links seniors, families, caregivers and professionals with state and local area agencies on aging. Established in 1991, Eldercare Locator is a public service of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Administration on Aging, in partnership with the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging and the National Association of State Units on Aging.

So Far Away: Twenty Questions for Long-Distance Caregiving
A detailed guide to long-distance caregiving and related issues. Also offers a detailed list of resources available to caregivers. The National Institute on Aging (NIA), one of the 27 Institutes and Centers of NIH, leads a broad scientific effort to understand the nature of aging and to extend the healthy, active years of life.

AARP: Caregiving
A guide to caregiving and related issues. With over 35 million members, AARP is the leading nonprofit, nonpartisan membership organization for people age 50 and over in the United States.

National Family Caregiving Association
The National Family Caregivers Association educates, supports, empowers and speaks up for the more than 50 million Americans who care for loved ones with a chronic illness or disability or the frailties of old age.

Interested in more info? Visit the following sections:

Senior Living Services

What is Hospice?

Finding a Geriatric Caregiver

Choosing an Adult Day Service

Your Hospital Stay

Your Doctor Visit

Other Life Pages
Senior LivingChoosing an Adult Day Service

Over 10 million Americans are part of the "sandwich generation" – busy, working adults trying to care for their aging parents while also raising their own children.

 Read More
Finding a Geriatric Caregiver

If the time has come for you to find a caregiver for your aging relative, Shelly Sun, founder and CEO of BrightStar Healthcare (a national caregiving franchise) has the following recommendations.

 Read More
Long-Distance Caregiving Tips

If you're caring for a loved one from a distance, you're not alone. Approximately 7 million adults are long-distance caregivers, mostly caring for aging parents who live an hour or more away. Here are some quick tips to get you started.

 Read More
Senior Living Services

If your aging family member needs assistance, here is information on senior living environments and services.

 Read More
Seniors and Disaster Preparedness

Senior citizens are particularly vulnerable during emergency situations – hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, even heat waves. Sixty (60) percent of people who died in Louisiana as a result of Hurricane Katrina were older than 60.

 Read More
Seniors Living Safely and Independently

Travel writer and author Doris Larson and her husband Gerald like their independence and freedom. So with an eye toward making their senior years as enjoyable as possible, the couple from Kent, Ohio are investigating their options.

 Read More