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Winter WeatherBlizzards Create a Winter Storm PlanGet ready for winter with these useful tips.Avalanche FAQsLearn the basics about avalanches. For more details go to PBS - NOVA Online and USFS National Avalanche Center.Winter Weather Advisories and WarningsWhen winter weather approaches, be safe, be smart! Stay alert to weather signs when the following advisories, watches or warnings are issued.Blizzard FAQsBe ready for blizzards with information from the National Weather Service.Thawing Frozen PipesIf you turn on a faucet and only a trickle comes out, suspect a frozen pipe. Here's advice from the Red Cross on what to do to make the water run again.Getting Your Family Ready for WinterWhen winter hits, sometimes it hits hard! Listen to your local weather forecaster and read through the following tips to keep your family warm in winter weather.Ice Dams Prevention and RemovalWater dripping into your house in the middle of winter could be assign that you've got an ice dam. Here is what you need to know and do, courtesy of the University of Minnesota.Hypothermia and FrostbiteHypothermia (body's temperature below 95 degrees Fahrenheit) and frostbite (severe reaction to cold exposure that can cause permanent damage) are real dangers in cold weather. Here’s how to avoid both and what to do if they occur.When a Winter Storm Watch or Warning Is IssuedThreatening winter weather expected? Be safe, be smart and tune to your local radio or television stations for information and instructions. Then follow these tips.

Ice Dams: Prevention and Removal

Water dripping into your house in the middle of winter could be assign that you've got an ice dam. Here is what you need to know and do, courtesy of the University of Minnesota.

What are ice dams?

Ice dams are a ridge of ice that forms at the edge of a roof and prevents melting snow (water) from draining off the roof. The water that backs up behind the dam can leak into a home causing damage to walls, ceilings, and insulation.

What causes ice dams?

Ice dams occur when a snow-covered roof is warmer than the eaves (the roof overhang). This snow on the roof melts and runs along the roof to the colder eaves where it freezes, eventually causing an ice buildup. Water is trapped behind the ice and enters the house or attic by way of seams in the building paper and roof decking.

How do I handle an ice dam?

Carefully remove snow from the roof, using a "roof rake" or push broom.

If water is flowing into the house, create channels in the ice dam by hosing the roof on a warm day, working upward from the lower edge of the dam.

WHN Tip: Avoid using sharp instruments, such as axes, to break channels through the ice. This is likely to cause roof and structure damage.

Do not use salt to melt snow or ice from roof. It will rust nails, damage gutters and downspouts, and ruin next year's lawn

If the dams are bad, contact a legitimate and insured local company to remove the ice dams.

How can I prevent ice dams from forming?

Seal leaks to prevent warm moist house air from escaping into the attic space.

Add additional ceiling and/or roof insulation. (Click here for a US Department of Energy insulation guide.)

Ventilate the attic through windows and louvers when insulation is added to the attic floor. This will help reduce moisture condensation in the attic.

Use electric heating cables along the eaves if insulation or ventilation is not possible. (Click here for more information.)

Winter WeatherBlizzards Create a Winter Storm PlanGet ready for winter with these useful tips.Avalanche FAQsLearn the basics about avalanches. For more details go to PBS - NOVA Online and USFS National Avalanche Center.Winter Weather Advisories and WarningsWhen winter weather approaches, be safe, be smart! Stay alert to weather signs when the following advisories, watches or warnings are issued.Blizzard FAQsBe ready for blizzards with information from the National Weather Service.Thawing Frozen PipesIf you turn on a faucet and only a trickle comes out, suspect a frozen pipe. Here's advice from the Red Cross on what to do to make the water run again.Getting Your Family Ready for WinterWhen winter hits, sometimes it hits hard! Listen to your local weather forecaster and read through the following tips to keep your family warm in winter weather.Ice Dams Prevention and RemovalWater dripping into your house in the middle of winter could be assign that you've got an ice dam. Here is what you need to know and do, courtesy of the University of Minnesota.Hypothermia and FrostbiteHypothermia (body's temperature below 95 degrees Fahrenheit) and frostbite (severe reaction to cold exposure that can cause permanent damage) are real dangers in cold weather. Here’s how to avoid both and what to do if they occur.When a Winter Storm Watch or Warning Is IssuedThreatening winter weather expected? Be safe, be smart and tune to your local radio or television stations for information and instructions. Then follow these tips.