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Mobile Homes: Disaster Preparedness Tips

If you're one of the 22 million Americans that call a mobile or manufactured home "home," you're aware how important disaster preparedness is. In 2008, 45% of tornado-related deaths were people living in mobile homes.

Although older mobile homes seem to withstand the most damage during weather-related disasters, all are vulnerable, especially if the weather is a direct hit, according to Deanna Field, public affairs director at the Manufactured Housing Association of Oklahoma.

So what can you do to protect yourself? Whether you own, rent or vacation in a mobile home, travel trailer or an RV, here are some direct actions you can take to improve your home and personal safety. (Special thanks to the mobile home owners Pat, Sheila and Elsie, and manufactured home experts across the country for these helpful tips!)

What To Do In Advance

Review your insurance policy to make sure you're covered for certain disasters (flooding isn't usually included). Don't have insurance? Mobile home owners can purchase insurance – either homeowner's or renter's insurance.

WHN Expert Tip: Insurance Discount Opportunities
Some insurance companies might offer discounts if you install disaster-resistant items or make home improvements (shatter-proof windows, shutters, earthquake proofing, roofing reinforcements, etc.). Ask your agent which items might help you save on your premiums.

Check to see if your home is properly anchored that meets manufacturer specifications (check your home's manual). Not sure if your home is properly anchored or safe? You can have a certified technician inspect your home and anchoring system and recommend improvements at a cost of $100 or more.

WHN Tip: Check with your state's manufacturing home association to find a licensed technician.

The anchoring and your home's manufacturing requirements must match the state building code specifications along with those of the county you live in (they will vary). "Check with the county first," says Jenifer Jordan, of the Mobile Home Angels, Inc., a company in Lantana, FL, that offers new and used mobile homes. "County codes change individually and you can't get a certificate of occupancy unless your home is up to code."

Make sure your home has good skirting —the material that encloses the bottom of the home but still allows air to flow through, keeping the bottom of the home dry. Skirting material and costs can vary – check with your state's manufacturing home association for advice.

"When you don't have an enclosure [around the base of your mobile home], the wind can come underneath the vinyl siding and begin to remove it," says Field. "You need a substantial perimeter to keep your home safe."

If your mobile home is an older home – 30+ years – consider making additional improvements.

"Generally it's the older homes that see the most damage, like those from the 1970s or before. The newer ones are built to code," says Jordan. "Here in Florida, the homes need to be in wind-zone 3, which will withstand winds up to 110 miles per hour."

Regardless of your home's age, evaluate your improvement options. Check with your state's manufacturing home association for home improvement tips.

If you live in Tornado Alley consider getting a storm cellar, which is an reinforced underground shelter where residents can go for protection from a storm or tornado. They can be installed for $5,000. Check with your park and county first before making any additions.

If you live in hurricane-prone areas, think about where you'll need to go to buy boards for your windows.

Prepare for emergencies. Read What to Know About NOAA Weather Radio, Home Grab-and-Go Kit, Create a Home Emergency Exit Plan and Create a Hurricane Evacuation Plan.

"We believe that weather radios aren't just for those who live in the area of a possible tornado," says Bruce Savage, V.P. of Public Affairs at the Manufactured Housing Institute. "You should have a radio regardless of where you live."

Get to know your neighbors. You might need their assistance or need to help them in an emergency.

Know where the emergency shelter is for the park (ask your park administration or contact city officials).

Inspect the shelter before you'll need to use it. If it's frequently locked, ask the park administration about who's responsible for unlocking it in an emergency situation. If the shelter appears unsafe, notify city or county officials about the problem. You can also contact the manufacturing homeowner's association in your state.

No shelter? Locate another safe structure (built with solid walls and foundation, no windows, sturdy, etc.) that you can reach in a matter of minutes.

Additionally, prepare for specific emergencies such as Floods, Winter Weather, Fires [WHN Link TK]Tornadoes, Earthquake and HurricaneClick here [WHN Link TK] for more Get Prepared topics.

Learn more at FEMA's Are You Ready? section.

When Threatening Weather Approaches

Secure any items that might be outside your home: lawn furniture, lawn ornaments, mailboxes. Flying debris is a major hazard during high winds.

WHN Reader Tip: Tie it down or bring it in!
List all outside items you'll need to grab and bring inside, or tie down if a storm is on its way.

Listen to the local TV and radio stations for watch and warning information.

Close your windows and shutters.

If a tornado or hurricane watch is issued, watch for changing weather conditions. If a tornado warning is issued, head to your storm cellar, shelter or other safe structure to ride out the storm. (Go to When a Tornado Watch or Warning Is Issued for more information. 

If told to evacuate, do so.

Additional Resources

HUD: Manufactured Housing and Standards
The Manufactured Housing Program is a national HUD program established to protect the health and safety of the owners of manufactured (mobile) homes.

How to Buy a Manufactured Home: A Consumer's Guide to Today's Manufactured Home (PDF)
An in-depth guide to choosing, buying, transporting and installing your manufactured home.

National Consumers Law Commission – Guide to Mobile Homes
The NCLC Guide to Mobile Homes details how to buy a mobile home, how to tell which homes to avoid, and what to do after you purchase your home.

Special thanks to:

Deanna Field, public affairs director, Manufactured Housing Association of Oklahoma

Jenifer Jordan, Mobile Home Angels, Inc., Lantana, FL.

Bruce Savage, V.P. of Public Affairs, Manufactured Housing Institute.

Mobile homeowners: Elsie, Sheila and Pat.

Be PreparedHome Grab-and-Go KitIf you were forced to evacuate your home and you only had three minutes, what would you grab? Make it easier on yourself by creating a Grab-and-Go kit packed with all the most important possessions and vital items for you and your family. Create a Home Emergency Exit PlanTake time now to create an emergency evacuation plan to employ in the event of a fire, disaster or other emergency. Create a Home Inventory ListIs this hard to do? Not at all. But if a disaster occurs, you'll wish you had done it.What to Do If the Power FailsHere are some helpful tips and suggestions about fires and the use of fire extinguishers. Need more? Talk to your local fire and police officials about safety training programs in your area. Remember - be safe and be smart.What to Know About NOAA Weather RadioInformation from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) about NOAA Weather Radio.Sample Home Inventory Lists Helpful RemindersThese forms may help you remember what was in your home. This will be crucial in the event of a theft, natural disaster or fire.What To Know When You're a RenterIf you're planning to rent, here are some things to consider and do before and after you sign the lease — and in case of a disaster. Mobile Homes Disaster Preparedness TipsIf you're one of the 22 million Americans that call a mobile or manufactured home "home," you're aware how important disaster preparedness is. In 2008, 45% of tornado-related deaths were people living in mobile homes.How to Display Your House NumberDon't hide your house! Know where to place your house number so it's visible.Home Office Organizing TipsTaxes, filing, inventories...sometimes you need to organize before you can start organizing!!Home Inspection TipsChances are, when you bought your last home, you hired a company to conduct a home inspection. But have you thought of having an expert inspect your home after you've lived there for awhile? Home Generator SafetyWhile home generators are handy for backup electricity in case of an outage, there are hazards to be aware of. 5 Easy Home Emergency Preparedness TipsHere's a list of five, easy emergency preparedness tips, direct from experts and people who have experienced a natural disaster first-hand.DIY at Home Safety SmartsWhether you're undertaking a huge renovation project or just hammering in a nail, it's better to be safe than sorry.Buying a Home SafeYou are looking for a way to protect your possessions and have decided to buy a safe. But what kind of safe should you buy?Create an Emergency Entertainment KitKeep kids busy in an emergency with these simple ideas.