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FireUsing a Fire ExtinguisherHere are some helpful tips and suggestions about fires and the use of fire extinguishers. Need more? Talk to your local fire and police officials about safety training programs in your area. Remember - be safe and be smart.Wildfires What Homeowners Need to KnowThe more you know and understand about the causes of wildfires, the better you can protect yourself, your family and your home from wildfire loss and injury. What Firefighters DoFire fighting is no easy task. Here are some basics about these truly heroic people. Fire Safety Questions and AnswersWhat to know before a fire.Apartment Fires What You Should KnowThis list accompanies Help – House Fire. [WHN page link TK] Be sure to read that as well as the following tips.After a Fire Questions You May Be AskedAfter the fire, you may have a meeting or interview with a fire chief, fire marshal and/or arson investigator. This helps the fire department decide the cause of the fire, which may also impact your insurance claim.After a Fire Common Homeowner MistakesIn the aftermath of a house fire, most homeowners are too distraught to think clearly about what to do next such as secure the property, remove important documents and notify the mortgage company.Top 10 Cooking Safety TipsCooking is the leading cause of home fires in the U.S. It is also the leading cause of home fire injuries. Educate yourself now on fire prevention and what to do if a fire does occur.Testing GFCI Electrical OutletsHere's what you need to know about GFCIs.Smoke Alarm Safety GuidelinesOver 90 percent of U.S. homes have at least one smoke alarm, according to the United States Fire Administration (USFA). Here are some tips from their site.Preventing Carbon Monoxide PoisoningAccording to FreeMD, carbon monoxide is the leading cause of death by poisoning in the United States. Learn how to avoid becoming one of those numbers.Kids and Fire SafetyGetting kids involved in fire safety is important…and often not the first thing kids want to do when they could be playing with friends. Here are some tips to get your kids input on family fire safety.4 Fast Facts About FireThe United States Fire Administration (USFA), a division of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), believes that fire deaths can be reduced by teaching people the basic facts about fire. Below are some simple facts from the USFA .Quick Fire Preparedness TipsWe've found we've found several blogs where people have said that their own home took only 5-10 minutes to burn. Whether you have 5 minutes or all afternoon, here are quick tasks could save you from a financial heartache down the road.Emergency Window Decals Why NOT to Use ThemDo you have fire decals on your windows? Interestingly, nearly all modern fire departments around the country do not recommend using them. Here are some reasons from the National Fire Prevention Association.Campfire Safety 101Toasting marshmallows and roasting hotdogs over a crackling campfire is one of the most popular American summer activities. Be safe and follow these tips.Backyard Fire Pit Safety TipsSitting around a fire is an American summer past time we hold dear to our hearts. However, not all of us can escape to the woods for the true campfire experience. Backyard fire pits are becoming a popular alternative to camp fires.BBQ Safety TipsGrilling is an American favorite. But if you're not careful, it can be a fire hazard. Read through these safety tips from the Home Safety Council.

Kids and Fire Safety

Getting kids involved in fire safety is important…and often not the first thing kids want to do when they could be playing with friends. Here are some tips to get your kids input on family fire safety.

Prepare, Prepare, Prepare!

Have your kids help you draw a floor plan of your residence. Tell them to mark two parent-approved escape routes from each room.

Let your kids designate a place for family to meet outside the house. (If you choose a neighbor's house, make sure all family members know the neighbor's address and phone number. And be sure to tell the neighbor they are 'it'!)

WHN Tip: Find a favorite tree
Neighbors too far away? Have your kids choose a favorite tree away from the home and on the lawn as your meeting place. Remind them to stay there and wait until the firefighters say it's OK to move. Make sure the spot is away from the road and driveway. First responder vehicles will drive on these.

Have your kids place a copy of fire escape plan in each bedroom. Make sure the plan is easily accessible.

Know the emergency response plan for your children's school or day-care center, as well as other places where your family spends time. Review these plans with everyone in the family.

Tell your family to leave your home at the first sign of fire or if the alarm sounds.

Teach everyone to yell "FIRE!" as loud as they can several times while they are escaping.

In the event of a fire, teach kids to stay low to the ground and to feel all doors before opening them. Remember, if a door is hot, get out another way!

Practice! Practice! Practice!

WHN Tip: Make It A Contest
Have the parents time the kids and the kids time the parents — the fastest one wins a prize! (Choosing dinner? Extra allowance? Just be sure prizes are decided before the race begins.)

Every month, practice escape plans from each bedroom (and other rooms) using two of the designated exits. This also ensures that windows and doors aren't stuck and that screens can be removed.

Practice like it's real! Blindfold family members (smoke will make it very difficult to see anything) put them in their bedroom and tell them to crawl to safety.

Practice fire escapes at night to see how long family members take to wake up. Kids have been known to sleep through fire alarms.

WHN Tip: Know when to "stop, drop and roll"
Kids could confuse "Stop, drop and roll" with escaping from a fire, so make sure that they understand that "stop, drop and roll" is only used when clothing catches on fire.

Children are often concerned about the safety of their pets. Discuss this with them and remind them that, in many cases, pets are able to get out on their own.

Fire Safety – Start Now

Talk with your entire family about the dangers of playing with fire.

WHN Tip: Not the time for hide and seek!
Teach children them not to hide during a fire but to get out at the first sign of a fire. Even if they started the fire, they should not hide because they are afraid of getting in trouble. Saving their life is more important!

Make sure matches and lighters are out of reach of children.

Teach children to stay three feet and/or three giant steps away from the stove while someone is cooking.

Talk about the basic rules of gas and electrical safety. If kids (or anyone) smell a rotten-egg odor, they should leave the house immediately. (If your kids have never smelled a rotten egg, find something with sulfur in it and have your kids smell it so they know what you mean by "rotten egg smell.")

Teach kids to stay away from frayed wires and not to put items in electrical sockets.

Sleep with bedroom doors shut. If you're not doing this now, it may be hard to change the habit — especially if kids are afraid of the dark — but doors can act as protective smoke shields and also increase potential escape time.

Additional Resources

FEMA--Home Fires
Offers educational information on home fires and natural disasters. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) prepares the nation for hazards and manages federal response and recovery efforts following any national incident. Also See FEMA's videos on fire safety.

Ready.gov Readiness U for Kids
A tutorial program for kids from the Department of Homeland Security. Includes tips on creating an emergency kit, plan and information on natural events. Also has games and activities to help learn the information. The Department of Homeland Security leverages resources within Federal, state, and local governments, coordinating the transition of multiple agencies and programs into a single, integrated agency focused on protecting the American people and their homeland.

U.S. Fire Administration for Kids
The USFA Kids site has lessons on home fire safety, smoke alarms and escaping from a fire. Also, there's games and puzzles about fire safety. It's a great educational activity to do on a rainy day or anytime. USFA Kids' mission is to educate children about fires and act as an information source for adults and teachers about fire safety. The U.S. Fire Administration is an entity of the Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

FireUsing a Fire ExtinguisherHere are some helpful tips and suggestions about fires and the use of fire extinguishers. Need more? Talk to your local fire and police officials about safety training programs in your area. Remember - be safe and be smart.Wildfires What Homeowners Need to KnowThe more you know and understand about the causes of wildfires, the better you can protect yourself, your family and your home from wildfire loss and injury. What Firefighters DoFire fighting is no easy task. Here are some basics about these truly heroic people. Fire Safety Questions and AnswersWhat to know before a fire.Apartment Fires What You Should KnowThis list accompanies Help – House Fire. [WHN page link TK] Be sure to read that as well as the following tips.After a Fire Questions You May Be AskedAfter the fire, you may have a meeting or interview with a fire chief, fire marshal and/or arson investigator. This helps the fire department decide the cause of the fire, which may also impact your insurance claim.After a Fire Common Homeowner MistakesIn the aftermath of a house fire, most homeowners are too distraught to think clearly about what to do next such as secure the property, remove important documents and notify the mortgage company.Top 10 Cooking Safety TipsCooking is the leading cause of home fires in the U.S. It is also the leading cause of home fire injuries. Educate yourself now on fire prevention and what to do if a fire does occur.Testing GFCI Electrical OutletsHere's what you need to know about GFCIs.Smoke Alarm Safety GuidelinesOver 90 percent of U.S. homes have at least one smoke alarm, according to the United States Fire Administration (USFA). Here are some tips from their site.Preventing Carbon Monoxide PoisoningAccording to FreeMD, carbon monoxide is the leading cause of death by poisoning in the United States. Learn how to avoid becoming one of those numbers.Kids and Fire SafetyGetting kids involved in fire safety is important…and often not the first thing kids want to do when they could be playing with friends. Here are some tips to get your kids input on family fire safety.4 Fast Facts About FireThe United States Fire Administration (USFA), a division of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), believes that fire deaths can be reduced by teaching people the basic facts about fire. Below are some simple facts from the USFA .Quick Fire Preparedness TipsWe've found we've found several blogs where people have said that their own home took only 5-10 minutes to burn. Whether you have 5 minutes or all afternoon, here are quick tasks could save you from a financial heartache down the road.Emergency Window Decals Why NOT to Use ThemDo you have fire decals on your windows? Interestingly, nearly all modern fire departments around the country do not recommend using them. Here are some reasons from the National Fire Prevention Association.Campfire Safety 101Toasting marshmallows and roasting hotdogs over a crackling campfire is one of the most popular American summer activities. Be safe and follow these tips.Backyard Fire Pit Safety TipsSitting around a fire is an American summer past time we hold dear to our hearts. However, not all of us can escape to the woods for the true campfire experience. Backyard fire pits are becoming a popular alternative to camp fires.BBQ Safety TipsGrilling is an American favorite. But if you're not careful, it can be a fire hazard. Read through these safety tips from the Home Safety Council.